• Environment and Nature

    Another reason why Centennial Park’s trees are so important

Centennial Parklands’ trees are more than just an important wildlife habitat, a carbon sink or a lovely backdrop. They also provide an essential training opportunity for NSW Police Rescue Unit!

Can you spot the officer?

Can you spot Police Rescue?

Can you spot Police Rescue?

The police rescue team (known formally as the Rescue and Bomb Disposal Unit) come periodically to Centennial Park, using our trees to simulate incidents that require accessing places and areas which are difficult to reach (heights, depths and confined spaces) including cliffs, rooftops, caves, mine shafts and…trees!

The Police rescue team await their turn up the tree

The Police rescue team await their turn up the tree.

Up a tree - for a good cause!

Up a tree – for a good cause!

Back down to ground

And back down to ground.

The team was led by Senior Constable Peter King, who was highly experienced in climbing trees as he was in fact an arborist for 23 years before joining the Police Force…and, you guessed it, Peter actually learnt the trade right here in Centennial Park!

Just another reason why these Parklands are important for the community…and why we love this place!

 


Enjoy stories from the Parklands? Why not grab a copy of Centennial Park – A History and discover over 126 years of great stories!

 

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