Work is underway to return one of NSW’s earliest war memorials and landmarks, the ANZAC Obelisk, to its home in Moore Park.

After undergoing conservation work and a recent refurbishment by the NSW Government, the Obelisk will be reinstated to a new permanent home, in Moore Park East.


History of the ANZAC Obelisk

The ANZAC Obelisk was constructed in 1917 to memorialise those who served from New South Wales during the Great War (World War I) and to mark the renaming of ‘Randwick Road’ to the now famous ‘Anzac Parade’.

For 81 years the Obelisk stood proud at the northern end of Anzac Parade before it was relocated to the median of Anzac Parade during the construction of the Eastern Distributor in 1998. In 2014, the Albert “Tibby” Cotter Walkway at Moore Park project commenced, prompting another relocation.

1917 view of the Obelisk at the northern end of Anzac Parade. (Source: Fairfax)

1917 view of the Obelisk at the northern end of Anzac Parade. (Source: Fairfax)

Crowd gathering at the northern end of Anzac Parade and Moore Park Road to mark the Obelisk's installation in 1917

Crowds gathering at the northern end of Anzac Parade and Moore Park Road to mark the Obelisk’s installation in 1917


Why is it important?

The Obelisk is a strong reminder of the Great War and the impact it had on the Australian people and in particular New South Wales. The memorial commemorates the departure of soldiers from the nearby barracks in Kensington as early as 1914.

It was erected in 1917 to coincide with the renaming of Randwick Road to Anzac Parade. The Obelisk has historic significance to NSW and is also of associative, aesthetic, social and representative significance. Despite having been relocated previously it has retained its contextual association with Anzac Parade.

Where will it be located?

We have worked closely with Roads and Maritime Services, Returned and Services League of Australia (NSW) and the City of Sydney to determine the right location for the Obelisk in Moore Park.  A new site has been chosen following stakeholder engagement and heritage analysis of 10 possible sites.

The location provides an improved setting for the Obelisk, allowing for the reinstatement of an appropriate landscape setting and provides a strong opportunity for public access and interpretation.

Work is now underway to build a new footing for the Obelisk, installing paving, bollards and lighting as well as lanterns which were built as replicas of the original gas powered lanterns. A CCTV camera will be located nearby to improve security in the park and at the memorial.

Works will be completed in March 2017 in time for the Obelisk’s centenary celebrations.

 

Artist’s impression of the ANZAC Obelisk on Anzac Parade (Image by Roads and Maritime Services)

Artist’s impression of the ANZAC Obelisk on Anzac Parade (Image by Roads and Maritime Services)

Image from the recent sod turning event to mark the start of works featuring the Hon. David Elliott MP, Bill Harrigan and Kim Ellis

Image from the recent sod turning event to mark the start of works featuring Minister for Veteran Affairs, the Hon. David Elliott MP, Bill Harrigan RSL and Centennial Parklands Executive Director Kim Ellis with the media

 

 

The project is managed by Roads and Maritime Services.  If you have any questions, please call the project team on 1800 677 700 or email nswenquiries@vbajv.com.au. For more information on our projects, visit rms.nsw.gov.au

 

 

Download our History Walk app

Similar Articles

  • Federation Celebration 1901_290x150
    An ‘entertaining’ Parklands

    Over the years, Centennial Parklands has been home to some of the most spectacular events in Sydney’s short history. From hosting the ceremony to celebrate Federation in 1901, to some of the most nail biting sporting events (such as at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games), the Parklands has been home to some wonderful celebrations. Over […]

  • Banksia2_290x150
    Celebrating NAIDOC Week, from important sites to precious plants

    The land on which Centennial Parklands is constructed does have a rich Aboriginal cultural heritage, so for this NAIDOC Week (2-9 July 2017), we are taking some time to acknowledge the site’s traditional custodians. NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee and with ‘NAIDOC Week’ week, members of all kinds of Australian communities are encouraged to come together to celebrate Aboriginal […]

  • Banknote_227x135
    What do the new $5 note and Centennial Park share in common?

    On the 1 September 2016, last year, the Reserve Bank of Australia unveiled an exciting new look $5 note.  Like most, we were hugely impressed with the tactile features to make the note more accessible for blind and vision-impaired people. We also couldn’t help but be a little excited to learn that there is a distinctive link between […]

  • Obelisk thumbnail_227x138
    Moore Park commemorates ANZAC Obelisk Centenary

    Wednesday 15 March 2017 marked 100 years since a small gathering met at the junction of Moore Park Road and the newly named Anzac Parade, to witness the unveiling of the ANZAC Obelisk. An important war memorial, the ANZAC Obelisk remembers those who served from New South Wales during the Great War. For 81 years […]