• Reflection_980x280 Parks and Places

    Where do I come from? An aquatic exploration of names

Anyone who frequents Centennial Parklands knows and appreciates the spectacular waterways that frame our three parks – Queens Park, Centennial Park and Moore Park. Once an inhospitable swamp, the waterways and ponds of Centennial Parklands have become iconic mini ecosystems, rich with history. Ever wondered how we came to name them? 

Here is a full run down…

 

Kippax Lake

 

Kippax Lake was named after William Kippax, a Sydney City Council Alderman from 1863 to 19889. Perhaps the more curious name, was its original moniker, Nanny Goat Swamp. While we don’t know where that name came from – we can’t help but wonder if it was linked to Nanny Goat Hill near Botany Bay.

Reason to visit – not only is Kippax Lake beautiful, but it is home to the Kippax Lake Statue, a sculpture dedicated to celebrating the achievements of Australian Sportswomen, well worth a look.

 

Kippax Lake

Kippax Lake

 

Busby’s Pond

 

As some of you will know, John Busby was the engineer responsible for converting the barely usable Lachlan Swamps into a viable waterway, supplying water to Sydney for more than two decades. Busby’s Pond is the largest pond in our water system and the starting point of Busby’s Bore, which took more than 10 years of convict labour to complete.

Reason to visit – keep an eye out for the Pied cormorants among the paperbarks that surround the pond.

 

Busby's Pond

Busby’s Pond

 

Duck Pond

 

As you might have guessed, Duck Pond was named for the many species of duck and waterfowl that frequent the pond.

Reason to visit – not only can you appreciate a huge number of birds and other water life, the walk around the pond is filled with signage and artwork about the pond system.

 

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

 

Fly Casting Pond

 

Fly Casting Pond is named after the many fly casting competitions that were held at the pond in the early 1900s.

Reason to visit – Stunning reed beds line the pond and provide habitat for the local fauna, and if you’re lucky you might even spot a turtle or two. Stay tuned for the introduction of the Celebration Steps, which see the area taken to a new level!

 

Fly Casting Pond

Fly Casting Pond

 

Kensington Ponds

 

Kensington Ponds were named for their location, adjacent to the suburb of Kensington.

Reason to visit – this is one of the few places in the Parklands where, if you’re lucky, you might spot some tadpoles.

 

Kensington Ponds

Kensington Ponds

 

Randwick Pond

 

Randwick Pond, like Kensington Ponds is named after the adjacent Randwick.

Reason to visit – the large area of stunning reeds and lilies attracts purple swamp hens and dusky moorhens. It’s also a common spot for the Black swans and cygnets in the spring.

 

Randwick Pond

Randwick Pond

 

Lily Pond

 

Lily Pond was aptly named after the masses of lilies that grow within and around the pond.

Reason to visit – because Lily Pond gets its water from a clean underground spring, it is often clearer than the other waterways and consequently is a wonderful place to visit and spot the wildlife.

 

Lily Pond

Lily Pond

 

Model Yacht Pond

 

Model Yacht Pond was once a hub of activity, with young and old enjoying the hobby of model yacht sailing in the late nineteenth century.

Reason to visit – It’s home to one of our most effective environmental initiatives, the Gross Pollutant Trap (GPT).

 

Model Yacht Pond

Model Yacht Pond

 

Musgrave Pond

 

Musgrave Pond was named after former Queensland Governor, Sir Anthony Musgrave.

Reason to visit –  Musgrave Pond is home to another GPT, but visitors are also likely to spot Royal spoonbills and White-faced herons.

 

Musgrave Pond

Musgrave Pond

 

One More Shot Pond

 

There was once a marble statue of a hunter named ‘One More Shot’, that lived atop a concrete plinth by the pond. While the statue was removed in 1970, due to damage, the name stuck.

Reason to visit – it may be small, compared to some of the spectacular waterways of the Parklands but it is surrounded by beautiful willow trees, definitely worth a view.

 

One More Shot Pond

One More Shot Pond

 

Willow Pond

 

Willow Pond was likely named for the willow trees that surround the area.

Reason to visit – One More Shot, Musgrove, Fly Casting and Model Yacht Ponds all feed into this beautiful pond and if you’re lucky, you might spy a Black cormorant or three.

 

Willow Pond

Willow Pond

 

Want more?

 

Curious about the origins of some of our other features? We’ve compiled a great list exploring the historical significance of the names around Centennial Parklands.

 

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