Baby birds around Sydney are making the transition from nestling to fledgling, trying out their wings and learning to fly. Young birds are often seen on the ground throughout late spring and early summer and this is a normal stage in their transition to adulthood.

Centennial Parklands is a birdwatcher’s paradise with over 50 species known to nest in the Park’s ponds, swamps, tree branches and hollows. In recent weeks a large number of young bird species, including noisy miners, magpies, tawny frogmouths and rainbow lorikeets, have been seen learning to fly, with mixed success.

Kookaburra

Kookaburra

 

Several birds have been handed in to Parklands’ staff over this time, having been found on the ground and thought to be abandoned or sick. In almost all cases the birds were happy and healthy fledglings, taken from their parents by park visitors with the best intentions. By going back to the spot where each bird was found, Parklands staff were able to reunite the teenage chicks with their anxious parents.

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow lorikeet

 

The Parklands Environmental Officer, Amara Glynn, says she is heartened by people’s concern for wildlife but wants to educate visitors about bird behaviour and reduce unnecessary human intervention.

“Early summer is one of the best times to go birdwatching at the park when young birds are out and about, starting to fly and find their own food. Often you can see the parents hanging around somewhere close by keeping an eye on their young”

Noisy miner

Noisy miner

Amara’s advice to anyone in Sydney who sees a bird on the ground and is not sure what to do is to call Sydney Wildlife or WIRES for free advice.

“If the bird is uninjured the best thing to do is to leave it alone. Some young birds really shouldn’t be on the ground and may be orphaned or blown out of a nest, and can be placed in a shrub or somewhere above the ground out of harm’s way” said Ms Glynn.

 

  • Centennial Parklands Rangers: 0412 718 611
  • Sydney Wildlife website: sydneywildlife.org.au/
  • Rescue/advice line: (02) 9413 4300
  • WIRES website: wires.org.au
  • Rescue/advice line: 1300 094 737
Magpie

Magpie

Similar Articles

  • Discovering the art of Shinrin-yoku

    Living in a city has many wonderful things to offer, but the fast-paced work and modern lifestyle can be stressful and draining on your mental and physical health. Discover how to combat stress through the art of Shinrin-yoku ‘forest bathing’

  • Discover the Bunya Pines of Centennial Parklands

    Centennial Parklands is home to about 15,000 trees across Centennial Park, Moore Park and Queens Park. There are Australian figs, evergreen oaks, exotic pines, eucalypts and paperbark trees peppered throughout the Park that visitors enjoy all year round.  Many people ask us about one of the more unique trees planted in the Park, the Bunya […]

  • Get to know the Buff-banded Rails that call Centennial Parklands home

    Volunteers are the unsung heroes of communities across Australia and the work they do helps organisations such as Centennial Parklands operate. Across the Park, there are a variety of volunteers that come from all walks of life that have contributed to more than 10,000 volunteer hours clocked. Some of the most unique opportunities to give back […]

  • Have you seen a turtle in Centennial Parklands?

    There are about 23 native species of freshwater turtles across Australian and seven species of native freshwater turtle can be found in NSW. Centennial Park is lucky to have two native species of freshwater turtles in our ponds and waterways. The Sydney basin turtle (Emydura macquarii) and the snake-necked turtle (Chelodina longicollis) can sometimes be […]