Twitching, birdwatching – it’s the ‘trainspotting’ of the feathered world. Or is it? What is it really all about?

Birdwatching is the observation of birds for recreational activity. It can involve observing with the naked eye, or by the use of binoculars or other equipment. Despite the name, birdwatching also includes an aural element of listening for bird sounds.

 

How long have people been birdwatching?

The term ‘birdwatching’ was first used in 1901, however people have been at it a long time prior to that. There are some indications that the activity now known as birdwatching was occurring as far back as the late 1700’s.

In Australia a regular group of ornithologists began meeting regularly in 1896. The Australasian Ornithologists Union was established in 1901. The organisation still exists today, known as Birdlife Australia.

 

A group of Swedish birdwatchers at a visit to Centennial Park in 2010

A group of Swedish birdwatchers at a visit to Centennial Park in 2010

 

What you need to know

Birdwatching in Centennial Parklands can be a very rewarding pastime. Not only does the birdlife change on a regular / seasonal basis, but for the more serious it is possible to follow the lifecycle of species such as swans, coots, swamphens and moorhens as they breed.

For the amateur birdwatcher, here’s our top three tips:

  1. Walk slowly and stop often
  2. Listen and wait for birds to come to you, don’t try to get too close
  3. Visit early in the morning

Want more tips? We have a  detailed list of tips on our website.

To help you further, we’ve also compiled comprehensive details on the most popular spots to visit and what you will likely see throughout the Parklands.

 

Want to ‘dip your toe’ in the water?

We run regular birdwatching tours called a Birdwatcher’s Breakfast. They are led by our chief twitcher, Trevor Waller, who is heading towards 15 years running these tours. Join us on the next one!

 

Health and Fitness eNews sign up

 

Similar Articles

  • New Moore Park Golf carts are driving innovation

    Here at the Parklands, we aim to create a more sustainable environment for the Parklands and future generations. At Moore Park Golf, we recently introduced LED lighting, solar panels and water-saving all-weather turf  as part of $1.9 million investment to improve the driving range,  greater course and historic club house. Though our newest, most exciting innovation is […]

  • Five ways we are creating a sustainable Parklands

    Centennial Parklands has valued and encouraged innovative ways to support the environment since its inception nearly 130 years ago. The Park itself was design to address the city’s burgeoning need for an “additional air lung to the city”. Since then, its legacy has been to ensure the projects we embraced were for the benefit of […]

  • Clean Up Australia Day
    Get your gloves dirty for a good cause this Clean Up Australia Day!

    We are very lucky to have such beautiful Parklands to enjoy, right on the doorstep of the city. While there are many strategies and initiatives in place to keep Centennial Parklands looking spectacular, every little bit of help goes a long way! You can help us by adopting the ‘leave no trace’ approach when you visit […]

  • Photo of the week
    Photos of the Week: What a View!

    The Parklands is often recognised for its beautiful vistas. From lush woodland areas to pockets of ‘semi-wild’ open paddock, to rocky outcrops, to rolling greens set before a magnificent city skyline. This edition of Photos of the Week, ‘What A View!’ is a celebration of your striking photographs of some of the most iconic and romantic aspects of Centennial Park, […]