The historic Kippax Lake in Moore Park provides more than just a picturesque backdrop – it plays an important support role for our living urban ecosystem both above and below the waterline.

The Lake’s ecosystem features a range of living creatures from the highly visible Black Swans and ducks above the water, to eels, fish and microorganisms beneath.

Here’s one story of some ‘local residents’…

 

 

The background to this story

The pair of black swans at Kippax Lake have been present for many years, although have been unsuccessful at breeding for much of this time (often due to heavy rains flooding their lakeside nest, dogs off-leash causing disturbance, and natural predators like eels.

After a suggestion from a park visitor, our staff installed a trial floating nesting pontoon. The pontoon was made of timber and a durable mix of fibres formed from recycled plastic. It was weighted down to keep the pontoon in place, however we were still able to move it around the lake if required.

 

The floating pontoon in Kippax Lake, Moore Park

The floating pontoon in Kippax Lake, Moore Park

 

Help us look after the cygnets…and the Lake

While we will monitor the cygnets over coming months, we would like visitors to Moore Park to help by:

  • keeping a reasonable distance from the swans and cygnets (the parents can get very protective)
  • keep dogs on-leash within 10 metres of the lake, and do not allow a dog to enter the water
  • always put litter in a nearby rubbish bin to ensure it does not get washed into the lake and become a choking hazard.

Kippax Lake – an important part of our city’s heritage, and an important home to our native wildlife.

 

The Black Swan family enjoying time together in Kippax Lake

The Black Swan family enjoying time together in Kippax Lake

 

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