Duck Pond is the place to be for ducks – and people. Check out why, and see some views of the pond you may never have seen before.

But first…

 

A little bit of background about our ponds

Did you know that there are 10 ponds and one lake in Centennial Parklands? In fact, these water bodies cover 26 hectares!

The ponds in Centennial Parklands are part of the Botany Bay catchment system, and act as a filter for stormwater entering from the eastern suburbs of Sydney, flowing through the Parklands’ ponds, then out towards Botany Bay. Most of the ponds are not natural – they were largely created from dams built in the 1870s – remodelled into ponds between 1886 and 1888 (learn more here).

 

About Duck Pond

Duck Pond is bordered by Parkes Drive and Grand Drive, on the southern side of Centennial Park.

Duck Pond is the second largest pond in Centennial Park

Duck Pond is the second largest pond in Centennial Park

 

It has abundant bird life and is a popular spot for bird watching. It is also home to The Ponds Kiosk, and features a wetlands interpretive maze, the wooden duck sculptures, a boardwalk (a perfect vantage point for looking for eels, ducks and other waterfowl), and the ornately designed Duck Pond fence.

 

Amazing views!

Here’s just a few reasons why Duck Pond is more than just a place for ducks. Depending on where you stand, and when you’re there the view can change spectacularly. Daily, seasonally, annually.

 

Duck Pond in late autumn

Duck Pond in late autumn

 

Duck Pond sculptures in the mist (photo by Marie Robertson)

Duck Pond sculptures in the mist (photo by Marie Robertson)

 

Morning breaks across Duck Pond (image by Phil Quirk)

Morning breaks across Duck Pond (photo by Phil Quirk)

 

Afternoon spring sunshine on Duck Pond (image by Phil Quirk)

Afternoon spring sunshine on Duck Pond (photo by Phil Quirk)

 

Sunset over Duck Pond (photo by Chris Gleisner)

Sunset over Duck Pond (photo by Chris Gleisner)

 

Is this the best seat on the pond?

Is this the best seat in the house?

 

If you love our birds…

We understand that visitors enjoy feeding the birds. However please do the right thing by the birds themselves. Bread and other processed foods are not healthy, and you may in fact being doing harm to the birds.

Think about the food that the birds would normally eat in the wild and feed them accordingly – for example, try feeding them grass and seeds instead of bread.

 

Download our apps

Download our apps

 

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