It’s official! Centennial Parklands holds a new world record!

Our good friend Tony Steiner has been awarded a world angling record for a catch of the longest fish of a species in an all class category by the International Game Fish Association (IGFA).

Caught in Centennial Park’s Willow Pond, the common Carp species was recorded at 89 cm in length and caught for the All-Tackle (length) record category.

The fish weighed 19.7 kg and was caught on a three kilo line taking approximately two hours and 45 minutes to bring in!

“I was actually stalking this particular fish for about six months and unexpectedly came across it after taking a Kids Big Fish clinic. After I saw it I ran back to truck, got the rod, bait etc and threw out a gentle cast. The fish came up to the bait, smelt it and swam away. To my surprise he actually turned around and came back – took the bait and then swam away.” – Tony Steiner.

This is the second IGFA world record to have been recorded in Centennial Park for fishing. The first was in 2009 by Paul Cooper, who was awarded a world angling record for a catch of the heaviest fish of a species in an all class category.

 

Tony Steiner with his world record catch

Tony Steiner with his world record catch

 

Fishing for environmental and educational benefit

An accredited IGFA guide, Tony runs the Parklands’ award winning program Fishing 4 Therapy, Kids Big Fish and corporate fishing programs in Centennial Park all year round.

Please note: fishing is not permitted in Centennial Park unless you are part of a registered program.

 

 

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