• Footbridge in Centennial Park History and Heritage

    Footbridges are far more than just for foot traffic!

 

Some of the most photographed features in Centennial Park are its footbridges. Well, maybe they aren’t the central subject in most photos, but you’re about to see why they feature so regularly!

There are three footbridges of particular note

 

Lily Pond footbridge

Built circa 1890s, this white timber pedestrian bridge over Lily Pond was built by the NSW Public Works Department. It has become one of the iconic images of the Park and is a popular backdrop for many wedding photos.

 

Lily Pond at sunset - by Phil Quirk
Lily Pond at sunset – by Phil Quirk

 

Frog Hollow footbridges

Built in the mid-1890s, there are two stone bridges in the Frog Hollow area – one with a timber pergola and one without.

Frog Hollow is a triangle formed by Grand Drive, Dickens Drive and Parkes Drive in Centennial Park and was originally the site of an open drain. Frog Hollow’s formal garden area was established around the turn of the 20th century and the footbridges were constructed in the 1890s by the NSW Public Works Department. The floors of each footbridge are made of arched concrete, and they are braced centrally.

 

Frog Hollow Footbridge

Frog Hollow Footbridge

 

 

Musgrave Footbridge

The Musgrave Footbridge may not be as immediately as attractive as the other footbridges but is no less important.

A timber bridge in this area was built in 1915, but demolished some time later (exact date not recorded). The bridge we know today was re-built after falling into disrepair in 1994.

Then, in 2012, members of the Eastern Suburbs Dog Training Club (who have conducted their weekly Sunday training dog sessions nearby since 1962!) donated nearly $15,000 towards the refurbishment of the footbridge as part of general safety upgrades in 2012. New ballustrades and decking were installed and a small celebratory event was held in June 2012 at the bridge re-opening:

 

At the Musgrave Footbridge re-opening event in 2012

At the Musgrave Footbridge re-opening event in 2012

 

Paul Rheuben (Eastern Suburbs Dog Training Club) in front of the Musgrave Ponds footbridge circa 1980s (left) and in 2012 (right)

Paul Rheuben (Eastern Suburbs Dog Training Club) in front of the Musgrave Ponds footbridge circa 1980s (left) and in 2012 (right)

 

Our favourite footbridge moment!

While it’s great to see and learn more about our footbridges, it’s only when you see how such seemingly small features can loom large in the memories of park visitors.

The wonderful Costa Georgiadis recently shared his personal memories of Frog Hollow Footbridge:

 

A very young Costa rides his tricycle under the footbridge in the 1960s!

A very young Costa rides his tricycle under the footbridge in the 1960s!

 

Costa recently showed us how spaces that looked so large when you're young don't look so large when you grow up!

Costa recently showed us how spaces that looked so large when you’re young don’t look so large when you grow up!

 

Health and Fitness eNews sign up

 

Tagged with:

Similar Articles

  • Banknote_227x135
    What do the new $5 note and Centennial Park share in common?

    On the 1 September 2016, last year, the Reserve Bank of Australia unveiled an exciting new look $5 note.  Like most, we were hugely impressed with the tactile features to make the note more accessible for blind and vision-impaired people. We also couldn’t help but be a little excited to learn that there is a distinctive link between […]

  • Obelisk thumbnail_227x138
    Moore Park commemorates ANZAC Obelisk Centenary

    Wednesday 15 March 2017 marked 100 years since a small gathering met at the junction of Moore Park Road and the newly named Anzac Parade, to witness the unveiling of the ANZAC Obelisk. An important war memorial, the ANZAC Obelisk remembers those who served from New South Wales during the Great War. For 81 years […]

  • Charles Dickens Statue
    A world treasure stands in Centennial Park

    Did you know that on 7 February every year a small celebration is held in Centennial Park? There are only three such celebrations held on that day around the world. Curious about what is being celebrated?

  • thumb image_227x135w
    ANZAC Obelisk returns to Moore Park

    Work is underway to return one of NSW’s earliest war memorials and landmarks, the ANZAC Obelisk, to its home in Moore Park.
    After undergoing conservation work and a recent refurbishment the Obelisk will be reinstated to a new permanent home in Moore Park East.