• Environment and Nature

    A honey shortage in Australia? Not in Centennial Parklands!

Centennial Park Honey lined up

May in Australia is…National Honey Month. Apparently. And you may be concerned to hear that Australia is about to suffer a shortage of honey. Apparently. Well, it’s Centennial Parklands to the rescue!

National Honey Month is about celebrating all things honey, and raising awareness about the important role that the humble honey bee plays in the food security for Australia.

Excerpt from ABC Delicious Magazine (May 2014)

Excerpt from ABC Delicious Magazine (May 2014)

However, all is not well in the kingdom of the bees. In this recent ABC Radio National interview, the issue of bee rustling (of all things) is being blamed for a looming shortage in honey in Australia.

Our guide to beating the honey shortage?

Buy Centennial Park Honey, of course!

(OK, OK, it was a contrived plug!).

However, contrived plugs aside, what isn’t in doubt is how delicious and how popular Centennial Park Honey has been.

We’ve sold out batches constantly since launching our very own Park-made honey, and was even this month featured in the ABC Delicious Magazine.

What makes Centennial Park Honey special?

  • Our beehives are located within a protected bird sanctuary in the heart of Centennial Park. Its distinct local flavours vary based on the season and the combination of nectars collected by the bees.
  • Our honey is 100% raw and unheated meaning it retains a full, rich flavour unlike many commercial varieties which undergo high temperature pasteurisation or other treatments.
  • Our bees are more than just honey producers – they’re educators and pollinators. They give us an opportunity to teach the next generation about where their food comes from.

Where can I buy Centennial Park Honey?

Direct from Centennial Parklands. Just visit our Visitor Information Counter or Parklands Office and buy your jar today. Here are all the details.

Buy a jar of Centennial Park Honey today!

Buy a jar of Centennial Park Honey today!

 


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