• Environment and Nature

    International students turn clay into art in Centennial Park

Students in Park

Recently we were delighted to host 40 students studying environment and conservation at the Chinese University in Hong Kong. They were visiting Australia as part of an International Leaders Program and came to learn about Centennial Parklands various natural and built environments. The learning may have been interesting, but what they did after was fun!

Following a tour of the Parklands’ flying fox colony and ponds, Ranger Sam provided them with a hands-on activity using natural materials from the Parklands to create a work of art in the outdoors.

After their ‘Renaissance pieces’ were completed the outdoor gallery was open for inspection!

The students then recorded and photographed their creations, and sent us some of the photos that they wanted to share with us all.

Great afternoon sunlight - lucky they came this week and not two weeks ago!

Great afternoon sunlight – lucky they came this week and not two weeks ago!

The clay sculpture gallery!

The clay sculpture gallery!

Nature and art, coming together!

Nature and art, coming together!

The students were delighted with their visit and passed on their regards and well-wishes to all

The students were delighted with their visit and passed on their regards and well-wishes to all

Just another week in Centennial Parklands. Another reason why we should love it!

– – –

Did you know Centennial Parklands features a great recycled Education Precinct? Recycled? Yes, the site is recycled from its former use as a storage and dumping ground for stone, the Learning Centre is a recycled building formerly used by Parklands Rangers, and the decking around the outside of the Learning Centre is made from recycle milk bottles!

The Education Precinct also has a community nursery incorporated that is helping us become self-sustaining with many of our plants!

Find out more here.

 

Tagged with:

Similar Articles

  • Tickled pink with Centennial Parklands’ new Brachychiton discolor

    Centennial Parklands’ new Pink Lace Bark tree planted in Centennial Park recently was the largest one trees available from a nursery and the largest in Centennial Park’s history of tree planting! Find out more about how it came to be part of the Parklands’ tree population.

  • Reconnect with the small birds of Centennial Park

    The ‘wild outer’ part of Centennial Park, outside the loop of Grand Drive, provides important habitat for native plants and animals, especially bird life. Centennial Parklands is one of the easiest urban birdwatching vantage points in Sydney, on an average day you can easily see 50 bird species over its 360 hectares. There are plenty of big birds […]

  • Sydney’s kids go wild for WILD PLAY!

    The Ian Potter Children’s WILD PLAY Garden in Centennial Park is proving a hit with the kids of Sydney. Over the past week, children and their families from right across Sydney made their way to the Garden, which is designed to be an outdoor learning experience for kids of all abilities and backgrounds. It is made […]

  • Hello sunshine! Rare wattle plant found in the Parklands

    We were very excited recently to uncover two very rare little wattle plants in the Parklands. The ‘Sunshine Wattle’ or as scientifically named, ‘Acacia terminalis subsp. Terminalis’ has large, fluffy, pale yellow flowers, and is so uncommon, there are thought to be no more than around 1,000 plants in bush regeneration areas across the state! The […]