Many visitors to Centennial Parklands have seen her. She sits quietly in Kippax Lake for some of the time, but more often that not you’ll see her in full fountain mode. She’s our very own ‘lady of the lake’.

In November 1964 the Sydney City Council (who managed this part of Moore Park at the time) gave approval for a public competition, under conditions laid down by the Sydney Fountains Committee, to obtain a design for a figurine to recognise the achievements of Australian sportswomen over the years.

The winning design was by Diana Hunt, and was completed and installed in 1967. It is made of metal with a concrete base.

 

Kippax Lake Sculpture and Fountain, Moore Park

Kippax Lake Sculpture and Fountain, Moore Park

 

More than just a sculpture!

Kippax Lake is one of 11 ponds in Centennial Parklands, 10 of which (including Kippax Lake) are fed by stormwater run-off from the surrounding catchment areas.

The fountain helps to circulate and keep the water in Kippax Lake moving, helping to keep the water from stagnating. However, when water levels drop, water may no longer cover  the inlet valves of the fountain. During these times we need to turn the fountain off.

And what does the fountain look like when it’s “going off”?

 

Kippax Lake Fountain in full flight

Kippax Lake Fountain in full flight

 

Kippax Lake Fountain lit up for a charity event in 2007

Kippax Lake Fountain lit up for a charity event in 2007

 

 

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