Many visitors to Centennial Parklands have seen her. She sits quietly in Kippax Lake for some of the time, but more often that not you’ll see her in full fountain mode. She’s our very own ‘lady of the lake’.

In November 1964 the Sydney City Council (who managed this part of Moore Park at the time) gave approval for a public competition, under conditions laid down by the Sydney Fountains Committee, to obtain a design for a figurine to recognise the achievements of Australian sportswomen over the years.

The winning design was by Diana Hunt, and was completed and installed in 1967. It is made of metal with a concrete base.

 

Kippax Lake Sculpture and Fountain, Moore Park

Kippax Lake Sculpture and Fountain, Moore Park

 

More than just a sculpture!

Kippax Lake is one of 11 ponds in Centennial Parklands, 10 of which (including Kippax Lake) are fed by stormwater run-off from the surrounding catchment areas.

The fountain helps to circulate and keep the water in Kippax Lake moving, helping to keep the water from stagnating. However, when water levels drop, water may no longer cover  the inlet valves of the fountain. During these times we need to turn the fountain off.

And what does the fountain look like when it’s “going off”?

 

Kippax Lake Fountain in full flight

Kippax Lake Fountain in full flight

 

Kippax Lake Fountain lit up for a charity event in 2007

Kippax Lake Fountain lit up for a charity event in 2007

 

 

Download our apps

Download our apps

 

Tagged with:

Similar Articles

  • Banknote_227x135
    What do the new $5 note and Centennial Park share in common?

    On the 1 September 2016, last year, the Reserve Bank of Australia unveiled an exciting new look $5 note.  Like most, we were hugely impressed with the tactile features to make the note more accessible for blind and vision-impaired people. We also couldn’t help but be a little excited to learn that there is a distinctive link between […]

  • Obelisk thumbnail_227x138
    Moore Park commemorates ANZAC Obelisk Centenary

    Wednesday 15 March 2017 marked 100 years since a small gathering met at the junction of Moore Park Road and the newly named Anzac Parade, to witness the unveiling of the ANZAC Obelisk. An important war memorial, the ANZAC Obelisk remembers those who served from New South Wales during the Great War. For 81 years […]

  • Charles Dickens Statue
    A world treasure stands in Centennial Park

    Did you know that on 7 February every year a small celebration is held in Centennial Park? There are only three such celebrations held on that day around the world. Curious about what is being celebrated?

  • thumb image_227x135w
    ANZAC Obelisk returns to Moore Park

    Work is underway to return one of NSW’s earliest war memorials and landmarks, the ANZAC Obelisk, to its home in Moore Park.
    After undergoing conservation work and a recent refurbishment the Obelisk will be reinstated to a new permanent home in Moore Park East.