Did you know there are 11 ponds in Centennial Parklands? While most people have their favourite, one pond is undoubtedly the most photographed of the lot. Can you guess which?

Introducing…

 

Lily Pond!

Lily Pond is located adjacent Lachlan Swamp in Centennial Park…

 

Lily Pond is one of the smallest ponds in Centennial Parklands

Lily Pond is one of the smallest ponds in Centennial Parklands

 

The pond was originally referred to as Fiddle Pond, due to its shape. It was developed as an ornamental waterbody in the 1890s to grow and display water lilies of various species (at this time the stunning white timber bridge was built).

Unlike all other ponds in the Parklands that are fed by stormwater, Lily Pond is fed by a natural, underground spring in Lachlan Swamp.

By the 1920s a range of water irises were also planted in the pond, and during the 1940s stone edging was completed to help prevent flooding.

Today its small islands, vegetated with papyrus, provide an important habitat for water birds such as purple swamphens, black swans and the clamorous reed warbler. Its water brims with aquatic invertebrates such as dragonfly nymphs, water boatmen and aquatic earthworms during warmer months.

 

Three visual reasons to love Lily Pond!

A picture, as they say, speaks a thousand words. So let’s just see why so many people love Lily Pond…

 

Lily Pond at sunset - by Phil Quirk

Lily Pond at sunset – by Phil Quirk

 

Lily Pond in the rain - by Paul Westrupp

Lily Pond in the rain – by Paul Westrupp

 

Lily Pond's most enduring feature - by Chris Gleisner

Lily Pond’s most enduring feature – by Chris Gleisner

 

Come and see Lily Pond for yourself. Such a stunning part of Centennial Parklands!

 

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