• Parks and Places

    Pondering…Musgrave Pond in Centennial Park

Musgrave Pond cycling

Stunning days of late have brought many people out to enjoy every corner of Centennial Park. We continue our series on the ponds of Centennial Park with a pond that – while tucked away in a quiet corner of the Park – is very popular with many. Presenting, Musgrave Pond!

First, a little bit of background about our ponds

Did you know that there are 10 ponds and one lake in Centennial Parklands? In fact, these water bodies cover 26 hectares!

The ponds in Centennial Parklands are an integral part of the Botany Bay catchment system, and act as a filter for stormwater entering from the eastern suburbs of Sydney, flowing through the Parklands’ ponds, then out towards Botany Bay. Ten of the eleven ponds in Centennial Park are interconnected, and act as natural water filters, flood mitigation and detention basins (learn more here).

The Ponds have evolved from marshes fed by the natural aquifers of the land system to dammed waterbodies forming the water supply of the Lachlan Water Reserve. They were remodelled into ponds when Centennial Park was being constructed between 1886 and 1888.

Historic image of an Austin 7 driving along Musgrave Avenue (September 1934)

Historic image of an Austin 7 driving along Musgrave Avenue (September 1934)

Righto, now which one is Musgrave Pond?

Musgrave Pond is special for a number of reasons:

  1. it is one of the main entrance points for stormwater coming into the Parklands
  2. it is one of the most popular areas for barbecues and picnics, and
  3. it has been the key training area for the Eastern Suburbs Dog Training Club for most of the last 50 years!
Musgrave Pond is tucked away in the eastern corner of Centennial Park

Musgrave Pond is tucked away in the eastern corner of Centennial Park

A pond fed by stormwater from surrounding suburbs…

Musgrave Pond is fed by a large stormwater channel that beings stormwater into Centennial Park from the suburbs surrounding Queens Park. That means, if you live in this area, the water that washes down your stormwater drains ends up in Centennial Park’s ponds!

Large deluges can sometimes turn a trickle into a torrent!

Large deluges can sometimes turn a trickle into a torrent!

In 2009 we installed a large Gross Pollutant Trap (basically a boom gate with some very large, porous socks) to capture waste and debris as it enters the Park through the stormwater.

While this helps to filter out much of the waste that may otherwise end up in Musgrave Pond, during periods of high rainfall the amount of water coming down the channel can be a tad too much to handle!

Support from a long-time user!

Last year the Eastern Suburbs Dog Training Club celebrated its 50th anniversary in Centennial Park, and in recognition the members provided funds for the refurbishment of the old wooden footbridge over the stormwater channel at Musgrave Pond!

And what are some of the key features of Musgrave Pond?

Key features to see and enjoy are:

A popular corner of the Park that retains a sense of peace…

Musgrave Pond is a picturesque corner of Centennial Park

Musgrave Pond is a picturesque corner of Centennial Park

Picnic tables under trees around Musgrave Pond

Picnic tables under trees around Musgrave Pond

Musgrave Pond features a nearby bookable picnic site suitable for large groups

Musgrave Pond features a nearby bookable picnic site suitable for large groups

Large flat areas alongside the Pond - great for picnics!

Large flat areas alongside the Pond – great for picnics!

But our little insider secret…come during autumn to enjoy a stunning seasonal colour change!

Musgrave in autumn - simply stunning! (photo by Ngoc Tuan Nguyen)

Musgrave in autumn – simply stunning! (photo by Ngoc Tuan Nguyen)

– – –

Interested in learning more about Bookable Picnic Sites in Centennial Park? Head to our website for all the information.

 

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