• Parks and Places

    Police rescue in Centennial Park…but it’s not what you think!

Police Rescue

Police Rescue is a serious and admirable job, but rarely does a rescue team undertake their tasks with a smile on their faces. Read on to find out why…and they reveal their most regular ‘customer’!

Tree climbing is one of Police Rescue's key skills

Tree climbing is one of Police Rescue’s key skills

The NSW Police Rescue and Bomb Disposal Unit is a specialist unit that provides an incredibly difficult but essential role.

Their roles typically involve responding to incidents that require accessing places and areas which are difficult to reach (heights, depths and confined spaces) including cliffs, rooftops, caves, mine shafts and…trees!

That’s right, trees.

That’s where we came in.

Base camp: Centennial Park

A team from Police Rescue were in Centennial Park this week using some of our tallest and strongest trees on Sandstone Ridge to develop their tree climbing skills.

The team was led by Senior Constable Peter King, who was highly experienced in climbing trees as he was in fact an arborist for 23 years before joining the Police Force…and, you guessed it, Peter actually learnt the trade right here in Centennial Park!

 

The Police Rescue team arrive on site at Sandstone Ridge, Centennial Park

The Police Rescue team arrive on site at Sandstone Ridge, Centennial Park

Up they go - as part of a two-day training session

Up they go – as part of a two-day training session

Scaling trees like this is more difficult that imagined

Scaling trees like this is more difficult than imagined

This was the first time training in Centennial Parklands for the Alexandria-based team

This was the first time training in Centennial Parklands for the Alexandria-based team

And where would this crack team use these skills?

The experience and training will enable them to rescue people and animals from any tree rescue situation.

People?

Certainly. They told us that they have experienced an increase of rescuing Paragliders out of trees over the last year!

Just another day in the life of Centennial Park. Yet another reason to love the place!

– – –

Did you know NSW Police Rescue aren’t the only Police unit to visit Centennial Parklands for training. There is, in fact a team that visits almost every day. Can you guess who they are?

If we said: they are the oldest police unit of their kind in continuous operation in the world, would that give it away?

Can’t guess? Well, here they are…

NSW Mounted Police

NSW Mounted Police

 

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