• Police Rescue NSW Birds and Animals

    Police Rescue drama in Queens Park

 

Visitors to the popular Queens Park Playground in Centennial Parklands were this week caught up in the middle of a dramatic Police Rescue incident…well, not quite an incident, more a sticky moment.

The early details are a little sketchy, with eyewitnesses not readily coming forward, but our Parklands Rangers received a call to attend to the following scene…

A canine visitor had become wedged in the playground fence!

A canine visitor had become wedged in the playground fence!

 

After a few attempts to delicately extricate our furry friend, to no avail, a few calls were made and the NSW Police Rescue Unit came to our aide.

 

The Police Rescue officers assessed the situation, cracked out the "jaws of life" and quickly released our patient friend. Then, quick as a flash the bars were straightened up again!

The Police Rescue officers assessed the situation, cracked out the “jaws of life” and quickly released our patient friend. Then, quick as a flash the bars were straightened up again!

 

Another great days work for Police Rescue and one very, very difficult post to write without using one dog pun. I hope you appreciate how much restraint that required. It would have so easy to be let off the leash and…hmmm…sorry.

We’ll end it there before someone collars me.

 

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