Most visitors to Centennial Parklands help our wildlife and environment by ensuring the y dispose of their waste in bins and not left as litter.  But getting waste in bins is not quite enough. Getting waste in the right bin is important. Here’s why.

Each of our 300 bins across the Parklands are emptied at least twice a week. We estimate around 475 tonnes of general waste is collected each year, and 124 tonnes of recycled waste.

Our challenge, and a challenge we set for our visitors, is to help us improve this ratio by increasing our levels of recycling. And there is one simple way you can help start this. Use the right bin!

 

Why is using the right bin important?

While our waste bins are collected twice weekly, unfortunately a number of our recycled bins have to be emptied into the general waste collection.

Why?

The waste collection facility has a threshold of between 5-10% contamination of recycled waste before they will reject the recycled waste load. That means, if more than (approximately) 10% of the contents recycled waste collected in the Parklands is non-recycled / general waste, then they will not process it.

 

What can we do?

  • Step One – always use a bin for your waste (you can read here about the environmental consequences if you don’t!).
  • Step Two – always use the correct bin for your waste (red lids = general waste, yellow lids = recycled waste).

Want to know what can be recycled?

This year we improved and re-labelled all of our waste bins with clearly marked and informative stickers.

 

Red bins lids and red stickers=general waste

Red bins lids and red stickers = general waste

 

Yellow bins lids and yellow stickers=recycled waste (with a description of what can be recycled!)

Yellow bins lids and yellow stickers = recycled waste (with a description of what can be recycled!)

 

We will continue to seek more innovative and efficient ways to manage waste in Centennial Parklands, but while this is undertaken, we need your help.

By using our bins – and using the right bin – you not only save our wildlife and environment in Centennial Parklands, but also contribute to the removal of waste from the waste stream in greater Sydney.

Thanks for your help!

 

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