Every year around early autumn there’s a purple spectacle in Centennial Parklands – a purple bloom that becomes one of the most talked about topics for park visitors.

And what are those purple blooms? They’re Tibouchinas!

 

The Tibouchinas are alive in their purpleness in Centennial Park

The Tibouchinas are alive in their purpleness in Centennial Park

 

So, what exactly is a Tibouchina?

The Tibouchina, or Lasiandra, is a small evergreen tree native to south-east Brazil. These trees typically get to a height of 5 metres, but can also be trained as a shrub. Tibouchina “Alstonville” (the species found in Centennial Park), is so named as Alstonville, on the far north coast of New South Wales, was the first area of Australia where the this cultivar was grown.

They are best suited to temperate and sub-tropical climates and prefer a well drained, slightly acidic soil and benefit from adequate watering in the growing season, and will tolerate full sun.

 

The Tibouchinas are stunning up close

The Tibouchinas are stunning up close

 

Where can I see the Tibouchinas?

The Tibouchinas are found in Column Garden, Centennial Park (download our Parklands app for a free interactive map).

 

The Tibouchinas are found in Column Garden, Centennial Park

The Tibouchinas are found in Column Garden, Centennial Park

 

The best news…

If you like them, you may be happy to hear that they can be planted openly as a garden or street tree or will also tolerate growing in a tub or planter box. Tibouchinas are relatively pest free and for best results, pruning the plant after flowering results in a dense growth habit and better flowering in the following year.

Find out more information on Tibouchinas:

 

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