• Birds and Animals

    ‘Noisy Miner moment’ starts a passion

 

We love to hear stories from our visitors about their Parklands’ loves and interests – and here is one such story from long-time birdwatcher, Trevor Waller.

Have you ever found yourself walking through a park and seeing a bird and thinking to yourself “What bird is that?”. I did this nearly 17 years ago and I’ve never been the same since.

It all started while walking home from work and seeing a small grey bird with a black head and a yellow bill. When I got home I looked it up in a book on Australian birds. It turned out to be a Noisy Miner, a native Honeyeater. Once I’d discovered this gem of information I asked myself what all the other birds were called.

Since then I’ve attended many courses on bird identification, migration, anatomy and other areas of birding. I belong to both birding clubs in Sydney (Birding NSW and Cumberland Bird Observer’s Club) and go birding with them most weekends.

 

Trevor demonstrates birdwatching through a telephoto lens

Trevor demonstrates birdwatching through a telephoto lens

 

Even a twitcher expert needs the odd reference check!

Even a twitcher expert needs the odd reference check!

 

I’ve travelled far and wide around the world finding and watching the birds that I can’t see in Australia. I’ve led bird watching tours all over eastern Australia and enjoy teaching others about the beauty and value of the birds around us.

 

A recent adventure

Most recently I enjoyed a two week birding tour in Mongolia looking for the birds that use central Asia as a stepping stone on their long migrations around the world (see bottom of post for some amazing photos from this trip).

I have long wanted to see a Lammergeier (Bearded Vulture) and to see them gliding over my head in a high altitude valley in a mountain in the Gobi Desert was a dream come true.

 

Trevor's accommodation on his Mongolian trip this year

Trevor’s accommodation on his Mongolian trip this year

 

Trevor and his wife Margaret with a Mongolian local!

Trevor and his wife Margaret with a Mongolian local!

 

Trevor's dream comes true - he spots a Lammergeier

Trevor’s dream comes true – he spots a Lammergeier

 

Thanks Trevor – great story and we’re very envious of your recent adventure.

 

Want to know more about birdwatching?

Here is more information about birdwatching in Centennial Parklands, and some of our best tips!

 

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