Centennial Park in autumn

World Environment Day (5 June) is a global day of celebration that raises awareness of the need to take positive environmental action. There has been plenty happening on the environmental front in Centennial Parklands of late.

Here are just a few great stories.

 

Restoring and improving our ponds

Thanks to grant funding from the Greater Sydney Local Land Services, we are launching a program to improve water quality in our ponds, which provide important habitat for water birds and aquatic life. The program will see the installation of aquatic plants along the bare and rocky banks and floating reed beds planted in Duck Pond.

 

 

These bare and rocky pond edges will soon be planted out with reeds and aquatic grasses

These bare and rocky pond edges will soon be planted out with reeds and aquatic grasses

 

Conserving our threatened species

The Parklands are home to remnant pockets of Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub, an endangered ecological community. We have been undertaking bush regeneration work, supported by a dedicated team of volunteers, in these sites to improve the quality of these bush remnants for many years now. In recent times we have also trialled ecological burns (controlled fires) to generate regrowth, and have been completing post fire ecology monitoring.

 

A recent controlled burn in the Bird Sanctuary, Centennial Park

A recent controlled burn in the Bird Sanctuary, Centennial Park

 

Looking after our much misunderstood animals

Recent fly-out counts of our bat colony in Centennial Park registered over 30,000 Flying-foxes. We usually see many of the bats fly north for the winter, but the warm weather and lots of blossom (bat food) is making the animals stay a little longer. While we work with a team of volunteers and experts in the field from local universities, we are keen to remind visitors not to handle Flying-foxes, but to contact Rangers if there is an injured bat on the ground.

 

Our regular Spotlight Prowl tours are a great way to learn more about bats and other creatures in the Parklands

Our regular Spotlight Prowl tours are a great way to learn more about bats and other creatures in the Parklands

 

Keeping on top of weeds

Noxious and environmental weeds occur in some parts of the Parklands, and we have been undertaking a range of control programs to deal with such noxious species. If you’ve noticed things looking a bit brown and lifeless around Kensington Pond, these plants have been treated as part of our weed control program.

 

The brown and lifeless plants (Ludwigia peruviana) above are actually weeds that have been treated as part of a weed control program

The brown and lifeless plants (Ludwigia peruviana) above are actually weeds that have been treated as part of a weed control program

 

Nesting boxes installed

There is a lack of large hollow-bearing trees in Sydney’s urban environment. The brushtail possum are one of the species commonly found in Centennial Parklands that may benefit from artificial hollows (nest boxes). We recently installed six new nest boxes across the park. We hope the possums enjoy their new home!

 

A new nesting box in Centennial Park

A new nesting box in Centennial Park

 

Putting a system in place

While we have had stringent environmental practices in place for many years, recently we have sought to formalise this under an ISO 14001 Environmental Management System. Such a system will ensure we manage our many and varied environments and open spaces in an environmentally sustainable manner. The first stage of this process is to create an environmental policy to provide a commitment to continual improvements and prevention of pollution and complies with all relevant environmental legislation and other requirements. You can read this on our website.

 

The EMS will look at all aspects of our environmental management

The EMS will look at all aspects of our environmental management

 

All overseen by our Environment Officer

Last year the Centennial Parklands Foundation provided the funding for a part-time dedicated Environment Officer (Amara Glynn) to oversee these, and many more projects across the Parklands. We appreciate this support and hope you’ll be able to see more and more outcomes over coming years of the work being undertaken by Amara today.

 

Happy World Environment Day everyone!

 

 


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