• Image from Wikipedia Birds and Animals

    See the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos!

Once in a while, you might be lucky to catch the sight of the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo foraging in the Parklands. While they screech loudly, if you haven’t met these fascinating birds, you’re missing out.

Here are five fast facts that you may not have known about the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo. (These will swiftly make you a ‘birding expert’):

  1. Their scientific name is: Calyptorhynchus funereus – the ‘funereus’ part relates to their ‘sombre’ and dark plumage which makes them appear as if they are dressed for a funeral!
  2. They are one of six species of Black Cockatoo in Australia.
  3. They are a rare sight due to diminishing habitats but you can often catch them at Centennial Park in autumn.
  4. Their favourite foods include seeds from native trees and pine cones – which they feast on in the Parklands.
  5. (If you’re game) they sound like this!

 

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

 

Where can you see them at Centennial Parklands?

You can often spot one of the unique birds in the Pine Grove, Sandstone Ridge or near Lachlan Swamp… all places where pines and banksias are plentiful (Parklands maps).

 

Now for some great photos!

Park volunteers over the years have captured some great shots of cockies at play in Centennial Park:

 

A close encounter with a Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

A close encounter with a Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

 

A Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo gathering in Brazilian Fields, Centennial Park

A Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo gathering in Brazilian Fields, Centennial Park

 

Decisions, decisions...which looks the tastiest?

…Which looks the tastiest?

 

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

A pine cone feast!

 

Come and see me!

Come and see me!

 

Learn more, see more…

Head to the Birds in Backyards website to find out more about Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, or (better still) come and see them for yourself.

You can enjoy them with a stroll at your own leisure or jump on to the izi app and try our Nature and Wildlife Walking Tour.

Don’t forget your camera!

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