• Image from Wikipedia Birds and Animals

    See the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos!

 

It’s the time of year that we often hear the screeching of the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo. If you haven’t met this fascinating bird you’re missing out.

Here are five basic facts that you can use to make yourself sound a ‘birding expert':

  1. Their scientific name is: Calyptorhynchus funereus – the ‘funereus’ part relates to their dark and sombre plumage that makes it look like they are dressed for a funeral (no, seriously!).
  2. They are one of six species of Black Cockatoo in Australia.
  3. They have been in rapid decline in Australia because of native habitat clearance, with a loss of food supply and nest sites.
  4. Their favoured food is seeds of native trees and pine cones, but birds also feed on the seeds of ground plants. Some insects are also eaten.
  5. (And if you’re game) they sound like this!

 

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

 

Where can they often be seen in Centennial Parklands?

They can usually be seen in the Pine Grove, Sandstone Ridge or near Lachlan Swamp where pines and banksias are plentiful (Parklands maps).

 

Now for some great photos!

Park volunteers Dominic and Daphne Gonzlavez captured some great shots of some of these cockies at play in Centennial Park:

 

A close encounter with a Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

A close encounter with a Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo in Centennial Park

 

A Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo gathering in Brazilian Fields, Centennial Park

A Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo gathering in Brazilian Fields, Centennial Park

 

Decisions, decisions...which looks the tastiest?

Decisions, decisions…which looks the tastiest?

 

Come and see me!

Come and see me!

 

Learn more, see more…

Head to the Birds in Backyards website to find out more about Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, or (better still) come and see them for yourself.

You can do a tour (try the Birdwatchers Breakfast tour with Trevor Waller) or pick up a Centennial Park Wildlife and Heritage Walk brochure from our Visitor Information Counter.

Don’t forget your camera!

 

Health and Fitness eNews sign up

 

 

Similar Articles

  • Baby birds leave their nests as summer arrives

    Baby birds around Sydney are making the transition from nestling to fledgling, trying out their wings and learning to fly. Young birds are often seen on the ground throughout late spring and early summer and this is a normal stage in their transition to adulthood. Centennial Parklands is a birdwatcher’s paradise with over 50 species […]

  • Hollows as Homes - Cockatoo
    Urgent housing crisis needs your help!

    Housing availability is not just a human challenge in Sydney, but one affecting our native wildlife. However you can help by joining our Hollows as Homes program.

  • Cygnets in Centennial Park
    Don’t feed the birds? Why not?

    We understand that the tradition of “going to the park to feed the ducks” is a hard one to break. Besides, what harm does it really cause?